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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
>>> the u.s. economy is growing but so is the income gap between the rich and the pour. we are waiting for president obama to talk about changing that and other aspects of the economy. that is the woman that will be introducing him. and we'll have him in just a few moments. mike viqueira joins us for now with more on what to expect from the president. good morning. >> stephanie. good morning. as usual when it comes to politics and policy in washington, it is complicated. the president is trying to put forward his agenda for the state of the union speech and for the last three years of his presidency. he is going to take the populous tack that we have seen before, and tie the affordable care act into all of it. he is going to be talking about minimum wage, and disparities in in income every growing in this country, and hearken back to past speeches he has made talking about making income distribution more quillable. and he had a lot of shoring up to do. this is a left-lanes think tank, the president going to the pourest region in terms of income in this city, ward 8, and he
of low-wage americans and their times and the economy as a whole? the debate surrounding raising the minimum wage is the inside story. >> hello, i'm ray suarez. the wheels of the american economy turned with the labor of low wage workers across this country. the dishwashers, retail sales people and healthcare providers who toil at the federal minimum wage haven't seen a pay raise in four years and efforts in congress to find one have stagnated. cities, states, and counties are taking it on themselves to bring their workers to income levels closer to the fiscal realities of these tough times. and it's no easy task. as much debate surrounds the effectiveness of image wage hikes and who really benefits. do these wage controls cost jobs? we'll discuss the issue on this addition of "inside story." but first this background. >> they deserve to live a good life in one of the richest cities in the world. >> reporter: close to 100 people rallied outside washington, d.c. city council chamber as council members inside voted to raise the city's minimum wage to $11.50 an hour. >> congress' fa
to additional jobs as more successful economy for everyone. by the way, we can look back in history and see in 1968, for example, the minimum wage in real dollar terms or in fixed dollars terms would be $9.44 now. and the unemployment is less than half of what it is today. the notion that minimum wage destroys jobs is disproved. and when you think about it, the common sense that says people at the lower end of the income spectrum are going to spend the money that they make, that will create jobs and will be good for everyone. >> low wage workers as customers. that's where i want to come back. we'll take a short break with our guests and we'll be back. this is inside story. >> fault lines investigates... fracking >> shale gas development could actually double the economic growth rates in the province. >> this is our land for thousands of years... >> do you drink money? you must have a lot of money to drink... >> as tensions rise, and protests turn violent, where will the debate lead? >> the situation was no longer peaceful or safe... >> they were bashing my head with their boots... they had
to do for our families. it's the smart thing to do for our economy. >> reporter: president obama used his radio address this weekend to push for an extension. house speaker john boehner said he's open to legislation to continue the benefits. >> we'll get the latest on the deliberations from either end of pennsylvania avenue. al jazeera america congressional correspondent libby casey is on capitol hill and mike viqueira is with me here in the studio. good to see you both. libby, let me start with you. word began to dribble out over the weekend that the outlines of the deal has begun to appear. >> reporter: really the only once, the rest of the economy has been left in the dust. they're coming up with a plan that would replace the sequester cuts, the mandatory cuts that no one likes the contours of. they would replace them, but how do you pay for the replacement. they're talking about user fees, airline travel, and potential cuts to federal workers benefits. and controversial things that they'll have to hammer out the details of. they have until friday decembe december 13th, and expect
a very rare phenomenon. >> is it stuffer at a time when the economy is not robust when the state's in which these cities and counties are located are also feeling a lot of strain, is it tough for put these restructuring deals together? >> the state plays a significant role in the fiscal health of the city. they offer state aid to local governments. that makes up a third of the city revenues. when cities cut back due to their own fiscal pressures local governments experience a lot of fiscal squeeze as well. >> are there fewer good choices when you're finally pushed to make a bankruptcy declaration. >> bankruptcy is a measure of last resort. joining anybody enjoys having to papaying pensioners, or putting cops on the street or fixing potholes and doing things that create vibrant cities. when they declare bankruptcy it is an indication they have got themselves backed in a corner that they cannot get out of. >> pennsylvania is a sizable place with an enormous budget. what got the city there and how did it get out? >> there were two problems. on a regular basis the revenues that the c
. what is going on in the economy? >> i think its more serious than the economy. employers own the long-term unemployment, and the what has d is the employment infrastructure, the methods, the tools that employers use to recruit and hire people. where in the past if you want to find a job you had to be able to walk into a job interview, demonstrate to an interhands down that you could do the work. if it was management, mechanical, weather. you had to demonstrate that you can do it profitbly for the employer. what has changed dramatically not what needs to be done to recruit and hire. what has changed is that employers are working on a dum dumbed-down system of databases and key words. rather than having intelligent discussion that allows the person to show you how they're going profit their business, employers are matching key words in the date abou database to ken resumÉs. they. >> peter, this up ends everything that we hear about how labor markets work. you need people to do tasks in your enterprise, and when you need them you got to get them. how could employers just sit on openings
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)